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Thursday, April 25, 2013

PIPELINE BLOOZ

 

christo, running fence


It seems like a time of being anesthetized by the news. Corporate news is a soporific anyway. Mayhem and killing and dying day after day. They're saying the surviving "Boston marathon bomber" is answering questions in writing, since he'd been shot in the neck. He got the big ones answered right away--were they by themselves or part of a bigger group? They'll make it into everything it can be made into before they're done. This event is made especially for tv. It is the best tv possible. Law & Order round the clock on CNN and Faux, cops in serious action. Alex Jones and people of his mind are calling it a "false flag" like the JFK assassination and WTC implosion. I suspect it is just them alone because it was so amateurish. If CIA were behind it, the casualty list would have been much higher. I saw an autopsy picture of the dead one. It looks like the tire that ran over him went over his neck, the side of his face and right shoulder. These guys were none too bright. I understand after they set off the bombs they went home and watched the mayhem on tv, evidently thinking no one would come looking for them. Got away with it. Wasn't that slick. Not. They started seeing themselves zeroed in on right away from surveillance cameras everywhere and cell phone cameras. This was a good opportunity to popularize police state. The police were indeed the champions in this event, primarily for not abusing power so openly.


christo, running fence


I see somebody is suing the owner of the fertilizer plant in Texas that exploded. I doubt that will come to much. They'll be up against ivy league corporate lawyers. The science of tracing a fire to its origin is awfully advanced by now, so how the fire started will be as quick to be found as the two Boston bombers with surveillance cameras everywhere. This will justify more and more surveillance in cities. One step closer to popular American police state. It makes me glad I'm getting old and it makes me feel sorrow for my younger friends, looking at what they'll have to live through. I'll have to live through it too in another body, another place, a child. That's why I think I'd like next lifetime to be someplace relatively remote. I like a bridge to civilization. Even though I may never use the bridge, I still like access. I don't understand the passion for city life. It's where one has to be to make money, and that's evidently the draw, except for the people too poor to leave. I made my decision in childhood that I would not care so much for money to create a miserable life for the sake of making money. It struck me early on that money is not worth what it takes to make it in big numbers. All through my working life I've lived on the minimum it took to get by. I chose time over money. I didn't do much with my time, but I've not had the stress that goes with money. I have the opposite attitude toward money as the people around me wherever I am in America. Where others see money a problem solver, I see it creating problems. I never try for the lottery from fear of winning.


christo, running fence


About a quarter century ago a very wealthy man told me after seeing some interior house painting I'd done, "You keep on doing this and you'll get rich." I said, "I'll never get rich working." He looked at me a moment with an eye suspecting I was being a wise-ass with him, but thinking on it a second, he realized I was not. Nobody gets rich working. You get rich juggling numbers. One can, however, get to the stage of juggling numbers through working. I've never cared enough. Money has always been a burden for me, a weight on the back, like I'm a beast of burden, my back loaded down with money concerns, a yak on the Silk Road. Electricity and oil came along, expanding agriculture and industry, increasing the population to the point the whole human population is in peril. The population boom went nearly straight up on a graph, and when something goes straight up, it goes straight down. Looks like what the Revelation calls the Harvest. When we're down to little oil left, provision will of course not be made for what's next, a lot of people will die out from famine and diseases. It will be a sorrowful time. It's time for earth's population to return to what the earth can support without stripping entire mountains like in West Virginia and Kentucky. The corporate mineral eating robot that is consuming the surface of the earth has stripped the continent down to little to no topsoil. Not that topsoil matters in corporate nation.


christo, running fence


The oceans are now too acid for the coral to survive; coral reefs are dying all over the globe. Who cares? Nobody, rather not enough. Humans are pushing other life forms off the planet by continuous extinctions. What we're ending up with is that neighborhood in Arkansas the oil spill flowed through. Oil Ink had it declared "crude" and they only have to clean it up by law if it is "oil." A paper composed by a legal staff and signed by a judge. The people whose property the oil or crude soaked into have no recourse. They can't sell their property. They're stuck living in oil sludge. The oil corporation too big to fail doesn't even say fuck you to the people too small to notice, regards them with the same attention corporate mind gives the ants that lived in the ground. Ground water? Shit happens. The republicans want to run a pipeline down the vertical length of the country parallel the Mississippi River. When that thing blows, according to Murphy's Law it will, the entire plains states, literally the country's "bread basket," wheat fields, corn fields, are in serious danger of waking up one morning and finding a lake of oil. In an age of terrorism, the pipeline will be a target. Nothing but farms, rural communities the entire length of the pipeline. A shit streak through the center of the continent, an open air septic tank left by a few people working the stock market, translating the resources of the earth into money for themselves tax free in the Cayman Islands. This is what the land of the free, home of the brave, has a powerful likelihood of becoming. Ask what have we done to deserve this? Our history is not I Love Lucy. And in a way, it is.


christo, running fence
 
 

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1 comment:

  1. As David Allen Coe said in the song..."If That Aint Country"......."dad got the house on the GI bill but it wasn't worth all he had to kill to get it......"
    amen TJ, the Good Book warns of the dangers of the money hungry......and IT never misses
    mbr

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