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Tuesday, September 8, 2015

AT HOME WITH CATERPILLAR

hans silvester
 
Woke from a long nap today too weary to do anything that required action or thought. Looked at emails, looked at facebook. Read an article I've been seeing for days, scrolling, a comet two and a half miles across due to hit the earth with a window of the last two weeks in September, calculated to fall in the ocean two hundred miles off the coast of Brazil and make tsunami "everywhere." Everywhere? Maybe so. I wondered how the exact location, considering a rotating earth, could be calculated so exactly with a two week window. It was clever, but stank too much of Y2K religion frenzy. Next, I found somebody's interpretation of Revelations prophecy in a documentary kind of film about a half hour long. It held my interest all the way through, not that I took it for anything but mentation. He had some fairly interesting interpretations. Of course, it leads to the biggest disaster ever on earth, snuffing out USA in one sweep. This to happen before January of 2017. But, if you're saved and know the Lord, He will keep you safe throughout the terrible time of tribulation for everybody else, the losers. Buy this book on how to survive and you, too, can live happily in the ruins like nothing ever happened. His short film was loaded with some scholarly research that made a good story, until the end when it turned into an infomercial boring as a late-nite used car lot ad, thumping a Bible.
 
hans silvester
 
Caterpillar walked in the door. She'd been outside in her wild mind another twelve hours. This time without me worrying something might have caught her, like a coyote or a dog, both legitimate concerns. I came upon a young coyote walking in the road yesterday driving, about half way between here and Glade Creek. It walked down the road in front of the car like a dog, loping along unafraid, moved over to the side of the road continuing his lope, like a dog. Passing it, I got a good profile view. Its tail suggested fox, though the legs were too long. It was small for a coyote and its fearlessness alone in the world of the humans told me it was young. Seeming lost from the pack, it paid the car no mind, just like a rambling dog. I felt immense gratitude for the opportunity to see a living coyote so close and it in motion. When I see one, I see the most beautiful dog I've ever seen. I'm uneasy with them being around, though I know, too, they mean no harm. They live amongst themselves. They eat everything small that lives on the ground, rabbits, grouse, turkeys, young deer, small dogs and cats. To them a herd of cows is a herd of cows, a source for food. Now we have coyotes, farmers who buy and sell cattle also keep donkeys. Coyotes learn to stay away from donkeys.
 
hans silvester
 
It puzzled me. Sleep half the day, wake up and check out two end-of-the-world disaster worst-case scenarios, pick up cat and talk to her, letting the images of doom fall from my mind. They went away as fast as water falls out of my hand. Caterpillar snuggled in for awhile. I put her down to get some water. I put a dvd in the player, turned it on, picked up Caterpillar after she'd had some water and a bite of catfood, sat down and watched the last half of the Who concert in 1975. It was a time amazon nailed me with because you bought this we thought you might like this. Because I bought Billy Idol's autobio, Peter Townshend has an autobio, Who I Am. Also a dvd of a 1975 show by the Who, because I bought a Siouxsie & the Banshees concert 1983. The Who my favorite band of the Sixties era. Some people object to this kind of customer-specific advertising, but I don't. The grocery store gives out coupons for things I use, not things I don't use. I was grateful to be pointed to the Townshend autobio and the dvd. I find it comic at this age that I'm reading autobiographies of rock stars. They were my age all the way along. It is now time for them to be publishing their stories.
 
hans silvester
 
Since Caterpillar's matted hair was shaved, our relationship is changing. She was freezing in the night and I took her to bed at night, keeping her warm under the covers. She did well, doesn't move all night long. This worked well for a couple weeks. She stopped liking it. The last couple nights she crawled out, jumped to the floor and went outside. She doesn't like it any more. My feeling is that it changed her rhythm, which is ok for a vacation, but a time comes she wants her rhythm back. She sleeps awhile, explores awhile, drinks some water. She's not used to sleeping all night long. I'm actually glad she's had enough of it. I'm a bit weary of it myself. She has also become more dependent on me holding her and petting her. She has developed the most pitiful mao she's ever done. It's plaintive and long when I pretend to ignore its appeal. Some people would tell me she's spoiled. She is. This is new behavior in her. Old age. She's 18. We don't have a great deal of time left together, so I do spoil her. We're the closest we've ever been. I pick her up when she wants to be held. A few minutes of petting and talking to her, she's ready to go about her day. 
  
hans silvester
 
 
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